International Research Conference

11th - 12th September

The event promises a huge gathering of key international players and speakers from industry, academia and the research community, forming an important networking point for all participants.

RegisterProgramme
W55 Construction Industry Economics

In the context of Construction Industry Economics, the consequences of this changing environment are many and varied. For example:

  • Demographic changes, particularly migration and the ageing society are issues that many governments are having to deal with, with huge implications for the construction and property sectors particularly in the context of housing provision.
  • Greater social mobility requires improved transport links, new housing is needed to deal with rising levels of urbanisation, social development needs a focus on infrastructure such as schools, water resources and treatment, communications and hospitals.
  • Many of the world economies are still suffering the effects of a prolonged economic downturn in which austerity policies mean that construction activities are constrained and macroeconomic factors affect demand, labour availability, materials costs etc
  • A key element of responding to change in the context of the economic uncertainty we all face, is getting the forecasts right, recognising whole of life costs and promoting value for money spent.
  • Innovation in information, communication and technology provides challenges for the industry to produce continuous and sustainable improvement. Technological change must be embraced but the economic benefits and the added-value to society need to be assessed.

Contributions on all aspects of Construction Industry Economics are welcome.

W65 Organisation and Management of Construction

Enabling the transformation to, and supporting the functioning of, the city of tomorrow, will provide significant new challenges to the way Facilities Managers (FMs) view the design and delivery of services and manage the operation, maintenance and refurbishment of their built assets. Existing service design theories and models are already being challenged by the emergence of distributed service solutions and the performance of existing built assets are coming under increasing pressure from climate change, societal demographics, and new business models. But, how should FM address these challenges? Which of the existing theories and models will work in the city of the future? What will FMs role be in planning and delivering the transition of existing built assets to those that are fit for purpose in 20, 30 or 40 years’ time? These are some of the questions that are being addressed by members of CIB W70: Facilities Management and Maintenance.

As part of International Research Week W70 would welcome contributions that: explore and challenge the philosophical perspective of FM and future urban living and in particular the relationships between citizens, businesses, public authorities and the built environment; present the results of research studies that seek to better understand these challenges and provide insights into new service delivery and built asset management theories and models; and consider new approaches to multi and inter disciplinary research that address the issues of co-production and complexity.

Contributions will be particularly welcome in the following areas.

  • Supporting (or delivering) urban transformation in the performance of domestic, commercial, and
  • builders and suppliers) deal with this constant change and how can they keep their business models aligned to it.
  • Commissioning and procurement: The variety of products and projects challenges the client to ask the right question to the market. Which procurement method creates a process that meets the societal challenges while not losing sight of the client’s specific organizational objectives?
  • Designing Project Organisations: During the last two decades, a variety of management methods have been developed and tested in the construction industry. The modern project manager selects the appropriate methods to respond appropriately to the project context. How can project organisations be designed and what does it mean for education?
  • Innovation in Construction: How can we stimulate and support the construction industry in the transition to a modern, sustainable and efficient industry?
W70 Facilities Management and Maintenance

Enabling the transformation to, and supporting the functioning of, the city of tomorrow, will provide significant new challenges to the way Facilities Managers (FMs) view the design and delivery of services and manage the operation, maintenance and refurbishment of their built assets. Existing service design theories and models are already being challenged by the emergence of distributed service solutions and the performance of existing built assets are coming under increasing pressure from climate change, societal demographics, and new business models. But, how should FM address these challenges? Which of the existing theories and models will work in the city of the future? What will FMs role be in planning and delivering the transition of existing built assets to those that are fit for purpose in 20, 30 or 40 years’ time? These are some of the questions that are being addressed by members of CIB W70: Facilities Management and Maintenance.

As part of International Research Week W70 would welcome contributions that: explore and challenge the philosophical perspective of FM and future urban living and in particular the relationships between citizens, businesses, public authorities and the built environment; present the results of research studies that seek to better understand these challenges and provide insights into new service delivery and built asset management theories and models; and consider new approaches to multi and inter disciplinary research that address the issues of co-production and complexity.

Contributions will be particularly welcome in the following areas.

  • Supporting (or delivering) urban transformation in the performance of domestic, commercial, and industrial buildings.
  • New business models for FM innovation in Future (Smart) Cities (service delivery, workplace models, Internet of Things, etc.).
  • Transforming social housing to meet future tenant needs.
  • Achieving large scale sustainability within and across building sectors.
  • FMs role in creating and supporting resilient cities (climate change, cyber-attack, etc.)
  • Adaptation and re-use of built assets to support future urban living (new models for building conservation and renewal)

Other areas that are relevant to facilities management and building refurbishment would also be considered.

TG81 Global Construction Data

In a rapidly changing planet, it becomes more important than ever to measure changes that are taking place in construction industries throughout the world. We need construction industry statistics of total output, types of building and structures, manpower, labour skills, specialist trades and other key factors. How else can we understand and manage the economic, political and social forces at work? Technology is affecting the rate of urban development and infrastructure investment internationally with implications for productivity, and profitability. Governments, financial institutions, industrialists and construction firms and their supply chains all need to study what is happening at a global, national and regional level and they need data to indicate the scale of the problems involved.

We have a vision of the global construction industry that provides a built environment fit for all people by producing that built environment in a safe, productive, sustainable and humane way. We now call for papers on international construction and construction industry statistical data.

  • First is papers relating to theoretical issues on making international comparisons of construction data, such as construction purchasing power parities, differences in definitions used in different countries, issues of data collection, sources of data.
  • The second is country specific papers dealing with analyses of construction output, employment, the number of firms, market concentration and market growth rates, and imports and export.
  • The third strand of relevance to TG 81 is papers on company performance including turnover, profitability and the assets of construction firms.
  • Papers on any related topics would also be most welcome, including property data, materials and construction products.

We would hope to be able to collect the papers and produce a joint publication for a wider audience, not necessarily only academics.

W89 Education in the Built Environment

For Education in the Built Environment, technology continues to change the way we learn by offering ubiquitous access to better materials. It also impacts on the landscape for education and research as it removes boundaries and shrink distances. We are certainly on a journey, but where will it lead and how will we get there? Work on a research roadmap for education in the built environment continues and progress so far will be presented in a workshop at this symposium.

The picture is becoming clearer and the main themes arising out of the workshops on the research roadmap included:

  • Pedagogy
  • Education technology
  • Developing academics – new and continuing
  • Building a community of scholars
  • Issues arising out of education policy

These themes, and many more, will be debated at the conference and contributions on these issues and others related to education in the built environment are welcomed.

W92 Procurement Systems

The main objective for CIB W92 is now defined to include both the investigation of the use of procurement to deliver wider sustainability (social, environmental, and economic) goals and the use of procurement to help maximize the value jointly created by the stakeholders to construction and the equitable distribution of the resulting rewards.

The subject of the conferences has developed also and has included a broad range of topics, including

  • Infrastructure Procurement
  •  Understanding Construction Markets and Competition
  • Public Construction Procurement
    • Transparency and accountability
  • Policy Through Procurement (social value)
    • Social Economic and Environmental Benefits
      Policy Conflicts – Competition versus Sustainability
      Skills, Employment, Small to Medium Sized Enterprises
  • Public Private Partnerships/Private Finance Initiatives
  • Asset Backed Procurement Vehicles
  • Procurement and Contractual Strategies
    • Supply Chain Management
      Partnering
      Framework Agreements/Contracts
  • Procurement Strategies in Different Sectors
W102 Information and Knowledge Management in Buildings

In an increasingly complex and changing world and organisational setting, the quality, timeliness and method of communicating and exploiting information in construction projects have never been more important, together with the environment which supports the use and exploitation of the information that adds value to projects and organisations. Equally, the communication, mapping, and exploitation of knowledge assets (tacit and explicit), wherever they reside, that adds to project and organisational performance is increasingly receiving recognition, and so is the value and measurement of the contribution of knowledge assets.

The topics to be covered include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • New technologies for improving information flow and their benefits to the construction projects and organisations
  • Improving the quality, timeliness, reliability, and Impact of information on project and organisational performance – Controversies and Critique
  • Strategies for the introduction and implementation of knowledge management practices in teams, projects and in construction organisations
  • Knowledge mapping – Know who, know how, know when, know where, and know why.
  • Managing knowledge across boundaries, across supply chains and networks for the benefit of projects and organisations
  • New knowledge creation in projects and their contribution to innovations
  • Ownership of knowledge and the measurement of the impact of knowledge management on project and organisational performance
  • Importance of information and knowledge in the discourse and exploitation of Big Data Analytics, Internet of Things (IoT), and Building Information Modelling.
W111 Usability of Workplaces

The CIB Working Commission on the Usability of Workplaces (W111) has, since its inception in 2001, operated as an integrated, international network of researchers, practitioners and organisations.

The work of W111 extends the work of CIB by taking on board the perspective of people, organisations and communities who use the built environment.  The concepts of usability envision an environment that is user-centric and service-driven and adds value by emphasizing the effect of our environments on efficiency, effectiveness and user satisfaction.

Background – trends to have in mind
Energy- og resources. Sustainability top priority. Technology development. Increased specialization. Increased complexity. Internationalization and globalization continues.  Increasing change ratio. Global economy.  Increasing cooperation and collaboration, both national and international. Increasing knowledge development and exchange. Education, research and innovation.

The past years’ focus on the usability of learning environments will continue.  An expectation is that usability related to health care and wellbeing, and communities will come up as important issues. Contributions will be particularly welcome in the following areas:

  • Learning environments. University campuses
  • Health care and usability
  • Shared space and how it is used
  • Usability briefing and learning loop
  • Empowerment of the user in projects.
  • User behaviour – user experiences.
  • Users and big data analyses
W112 Culture in Construction
(To be populated)
W113 Law and Dispute Resolution

The Working Commission is a worldwide community of legal scholars working in the fields of property, construction and the built environment. Our focus is on the application of law in these contexts and our membership includes those with expertise in property, construction, housing, planning and environmental law as well as the many other areas of law which impact on the wider built environment.

Papers are invited from academics and practitioners for the 2017 legal research symposium which will address legal topics affecting the built environment. All papers will be accommodated within one of the following themes:

  •  Construction Law
  • Property & Planning Law
  •  Building Regulation & Control
  •  Legal Aspects of Building Information Modelling
  •  Environmental Law
  •  Legal Education in Construction & Property
  •  Alternative Dispute Resolution
  •  Professional Liability & Ethics

Other areas that are relevant to law and dispute resolution within the built environment may also be considered.

Presenters are encouraged to submit their papers for consideration for publication in the International Journal of Law in the Built Environment.  The Journal particularly welcomes submissions in the areas of Planning Law, Property Law and Environmental Law.  If colleagues want to discuss suitability for submission then please e-mail the Editor in Chief, Julie Adshead on j.adshead@mmu.ac.uk.

W117 Performance Information in Construction

Performance Information in Construction is improving the results in the construction supply chains through the use of expertise of suppliers in the realisation of projects. Expertise is shown through performance based metrics, that illustrate that the expert is able to do the job. So performance information moves people from marketing talks to real proven and shown performance based cooperation. They will reproduce this way of working because of their expertise and by doing so, strengthen their expertise by each following project.

Performance Information in Construction has made a great growth in the past 10 years, contributing to the construction industry through a philosophy and a methodology to improve the utilization of expertise in the market. Aiming for the improvement of results in the construction industry, W117 has generated licensed technology. Also, W117 developed the following:

  1. Best Value Approach philosophy (BVA).
  2. Best Value (BV) methodology.
  3. Performance Information Procurement System (PIPS).
  4. Performance Information Risk Management System (PIRMS).
  5. Information Measurement Theory (IMT).
  6. A new project management model based on IMT.
  7. Scientific research on both the philosophy and the technology.
  8. Publications in many countries and languages (such as English, Dutch, Polish and Norwegian).

All contributions are welcomed

W118 Clients and Users in Construction

Clients and users play a significant role in shaping construction and real estate. Getting a better grasp of their aspirations, needs and behaviour will open up new and important roads for the industry to deliver more value for money. Against this background the aim of the Commission is:

  • to bring together the experience and expertise of researchers and practitioners,
  • to develop, share and disseminate appropriate research theories and practices for successful client management of procurement and innovation, and
  • to encourage and facilitate new collaborative and multi-disciplinary research both within and outside of CIB.

The Commission will define what constitutes Clients and Users in Construction, will identify appropriate procurement and management strategies, will classify methods for engaging users in decision making processes and will develop appropriate related guidance material for clients and users.

The topics to be covered include, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  • Growing, migrating, and ageing: The 21st century human population
  • The water, energy, food and climate nexus: Time for joined-up thinking
  • The changing geo-economic and geopolitical landscape
  • A moving frontier: How digitalisation will drive economies and shape the ways we work
  • Wealth, health and knowledge: The great global divide?

Contributions on all aspects of clients and users are welcome.

W120 Disasters and the Built Environment

Rapid growth of urban centres presents numerous challenges to humanity in the 21st Century, many of which can be addressed through built environment solutions. In the face of more frequent and powerful hazards, the future of vulnerable and growing populations is increasingly perilous. In this context of rapid and volatile change, W120 aims to respond to human vulnerability and the importance of protecting and enhancing life. We welcome papers related to disasters and the built environment from various perspectives, including:

  • Stakeholder engagement and collaboration
  • Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) and Climate Change Adaptation
  • Professional Competencies for DRR
  • Strategic urban planning for DRR
  • Tools / frameworks / models to support disaster related activities
  • Education in DRR/Resilience
  • Disasters and Displaced People
W121 Offsite Construction
W121, a new working commission has been established recently by CIB. The scope of this Commission focuses on: Process improvement, Innovation, Visualisation, Process models, Strategic and operational business models, Training and development for offsite construction. The precursor of this Commission CIB TG74 produced a Research Roadmap for Offsite Construction that emphasised the need for work in such areas as: Design / Construction / Manufacturing, ICT integrated solutions, socio-economic drivers, costs and value streams and skill development in support of further development and application of the concept of Offsite Construction. TG74 provided the foundations for this remit, highlighting the need for new business models, process integration, design decisions and especially, Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DfMA), stakeholder and supply chain synergies etc. Given the growing importance of offsite construction, W121 will purposefully focus on high impact, high value issues – especially the efficiencies and challenges associated with implementation. W121 provides a bespoke developmental platform for shaping future research in offsite construction. It will also critically explore these issues throughout its tenure, acting as a beacon for researchers and practitioners to come together and share their experiences and knowledge on offsite implementation. W121 is now the principal formal conduit for promoting offsite as an important research area among new and early career researchers. Knowledge creation, exchange and dissemination concentrates explicitly on impact and outreach through: research, practice, policy/ regulatory bodies, and societal stakeholders.
W122 Public Private Partnerships

Research in PPP continues to grow and findings need to be disseminated wider, so as to improve implementation. PPP related issues recently encountered in research and related publications include: PPP in terms of: structures, systems & mechanisms, stakeholder management, project and corporate financing; risk and value management; market analysis, modelling and forecasting; relational contracting and relationship management, sustainability frameworks, project management, sustainable procurement strategies, capital structure decisions and management; statutory regulations in the PPP environment; developed and developing countries’ issues; transaction management, design quality, service levels and performance, legal and contractual requirements, role of financial and insurance sectors; institutional and multilateral funding, life cycle analyses, asset management etc.

Papers are welcomed in any of the above and related areas, as well as on any other emerging PPP issues in our changing world and for “shaping tomorrows’ Built Environment” better. Examples of some specific topics in the PPP realm that may be addressed (in the context of PPP) are:

  • Decision Models / Frameworks
  • Policies and Strategies
  • Implementation – Needs and Issues
  • Markets
  • Financing
  • Performance
  • Risk Management
  • Relationship Management
  • Sustainability of the developed infrastructure / services  Governance & Institutions
  • New challenges and Opportunities
  • Managing Change & Innovation
  • Renegotiating / Refinancing PPPs; Real options
  • PPP for a Sustainable Built Environment
  • PPP and Green Innovation
Energy, Building Performance and Environments

The issue of energy consumption in both new and existing buildings is a major issue for the built environment. Energy efficiency plays into issues of climate change, fuel poverty and energy security and remains a global challenge. This stream is concerned with understanding the energy efficiency of buildings, how this affects building performance and wider issues of how buildings will perform into the future. This also focuses on how we can use models and measured performance to help us better understand how to address these issues and better understand phenomena such as the performance gap. Examples of the areas in which we welcome papers are:

  • Building energy performance  – energy efficiency, building physics,
  • Internal environments and human factors – thermal comfort, visual comfort, indoor air quality
  • Modelling and measurement methods and issues – methods for modelling and measuring buildings and external environments
  • Future climate  and responses – urban heat islands, future climate, models and decision making
  • Eco-innovation and sustainable construction – technical solutions to improving building performance now and in the future

Scientific Review Committee Members include:

  • Dr A Agapiou,  University of Strathclyde, UK
  • Professor A Akintoye, University of Central Lancashire, UK
  • Professor M Arif, University of Wolverhampton, UK
  • Professor D Artan Ilter, Istanbul Technical University, Turkey
  • Dr B Awuzie, Central University of Technology, South Africa
  • Dr S Azhar, Auburn University, USA
  • Dr L Bosher, Loughborough University, UK
  • Professor D Boyd, Birmingham City University, UK
  • Dr A Bridge, Queensland University of Technology, Australia
  • Dr R A Burt, Auburn University, USA
  • Professor Dr J Caramelo Gomes, UPT, Porto, Portugal
  • Dr I Y S Chan, University of Hong Kong, China
  • Dr P W Chan, University of Manchester, UK
  • J Charlson, University of Wolverhampton, UK
  • Dr E Chinyio, University of Wolverhampton, UK
  • Dr K Chmutina, Loughborough University, UK
  • Dr J Cooper, University of Salford, UK
  • Professor A Dainty, Loughborough University, UK
  • Professor C Egbu, London South Bank University, UK
  • Professor A Elmualim, University of South Australia, Australia
  • Professor R Fellows, Loughborough University, UK
  • Professor J Goulding, Northumbria University, UK
  • Dr S Gruneberg, University of Westminster, UK
  • Professor G Hansen, Norwegian University of Science & Technology, Norway
  • Dr  K  Haugbølle,  SBi – Danish Building Research Institute,  Denmark
  • Professor T Haugen, Norwegian University of Science & Technology, Norway
  • P Huovinen, Tampere University of Technology, Finland
  • Dr M C Jefferies, University of Newcastle, Australia
  • Professor P A Jensen, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark
  • Professor K Jones, Anglia Ruskin University, UK
  • Professor K  Kähkönen, Tampere University of Technology, Finland
  • Professor S Kajewski,  Queensland University of Technology, Australia
  • Dr M Khalfan, RMIT University, Australia
  • Professor D Koch, Purdue University, Australia
  • Professor M Kumaraswamy, University of Hong Kong, China
  • Professor J Lai, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, China
  • Dr T I Lam, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, China
  • Professor S Lavy, Texas A&M University, USA
  • Professor Mel Lees, Birmingham City University, UK
  • Professor G Lindahl, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden
  • Professor A Liu, University of Hong Kong, China
  • Professor J Lopes, Polytechnic Institute of Braganza, Portugal
  • Dr C McAleenan, University of Ulster at Jordanstown, UK
  • Professor P McDermott, University of Salford UK
  • A Murray, University College London, UK
  • Dr G Nardelli, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark
  • Professor S Nenonen, University of Auckland, New Zealand
  • Dr S Newton, University of New South Wales, Australia
  • Dr F P Rahimian, University of Strathclyde, UK
  • Professor S Rowlinson, University of Hong Kong, China
  • Professor L Ruddock, University of Salford, UK
  • Professor S Santema, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
  • Professor J J Smallwood, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, South Africa
  • Dr A Straub, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
  • Dr S Suresh, University of Wolverhampton, UK
  • Dr C Thomson, Glasgow Caledonian University, UK
  • Dr W Tijhuis, University of Twente, The Netherlands
  • Dr I Trushell, Glasgow Caledonian University, UK
  • Professor K J Tu, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taiwan
  • Dr J von Meding, University of Newcastle, Australia
  • Professor J W F Wamelink, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
  • Professor T Yashiro, University of Tokyo, Japan
  • Abstract submission deadline: 28th February 2017
  • Abstract acceptance notification: 7th March 2017
  • Full papers’ submission deadline: 21st April 2017
  • Paper review notification: 15th May 2017
  • Final papers’ deadline: 5th June 2017

PAPER INSTRUCTIONS TO AUTHORS

MANUSCRIPT

 Manuscripts should not exceed 12 pages (including the Reference list). They should be organised in the following order:

  • Title
  • Abstract (200 words maximum)
  • Keywords (5 keywords maximum)
  • Main text (introduction/ background, literature, methodology, results and discussion) – tables and figures should be included in the text
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Paper size: The paper should be A4 size.
  • Paper margins: Margins should be 1 inch (2.54cm) all round
  • Font type and sizes: Font should be in Times New Roman. Font size for the title must be 14pt; font size of the abstract and keywords must be 10pt; Font size of all first line headings should be 12pt; the remaining text of the main body of the paper should be 12 point; font size of the list of references should be 10pt.
  • Title of the paper: The title of the paper must be bold in ALL CAPITALS and centred. Leave two blank lines between the title and the abstract.
  • Abstract: The abstract must be justified. The indentation from both left and right should be 0.49” (inches). Leave a single space (10pt) between the abstract and the keywords.
  • Key words: The key words should being on a new line. It should be alphabetically arranged. Leave two single spaces between the keywords and the main text of the paper.
  • Author’s name/s, affiliation, e-mail address: Please do not include author’s name/s, affiliation or e-mail address in this version of the paper in order to facilitate the blind review process.
  • File name: Name your full paper with the relevant paper Submission ID. Do not include author’s name/s.
  • File type: Full paper should be in Word (.doc) format only. Papers with other formats may not be accepted by the paper submission system.

Please click here to down load the paper template

You can also download the paper guidelines and template in one document here.

FULL PAPER INSTRUCTIONS TO AUTHORS

MANUSCRIPT

– Manuscripts should not exceed 12 pages (including the Reference list). They should be organised in the following order:

* Title
*Names of authors, affiliation and e-mail address (of the first author)
* Abstract (200 words maximum)
*Keywords (5 keywords maximum)
* Main text (introduction/ background, literature, methodology, results and discussion) – tables and figures should be included in the text
*Conclusions
*References

– Paper size: The paper should be A4 size.
– Paper margins: Margins should be 1 inch (2.54cm) all round
– Font type and sizes: Font should be in Times New Roman. Font size for the title must be 14pt; font size of the abstract and keywords must be 10pt; Font size of all first line headings should be 12pt; the remaining text of the main body of the paper should be 12 point; font size of the list of references should be 10pt.
– Title of the paper: The title of the paper must be bold in ALL CAPITALS and centred. Leave one blank line between the title and the author.
– Author’s name/s: The author’s name/s (no titles or qualifications included) in leading capitals, sentence case, bold and centred. Leave 6pt line spacing between author’s name/s and the affiliation and between affiliation and e-mail address.
– Author’s affiliation: The author’s affiliation must be in title case, italics and centred.
– Author’s e-mail address: Only the e-mail address of the first author should be provided. It should be in sentence case and centred. Leave two single spaces between (10pt) the e-mail address and the abstract.
– Abstract: The abstract must be justified. The indentation from both left and right should be 0.49” (inches). Leave a single space (10pt) between the abstract and the keywords.
– Key words: The key words should being on a new line. It should be alphabetically arranged. Leave two single spaces between the keywords and the main text of the paper.

Further details on the layout of your paper are given in this here.


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